Feb 292016
 

morricone

The Oscars are over for another year, with the 88th Awards taking place today at the Dolby Theatre. It was one of the weirdest (and longest) ceremonies in recent years. The order of the presentation this year was meant to represent the journey through a film’s production, but that made sense for a mere two awards, and the ceremony was broken up by satirical clips, bizarre interludes, a troupe of girl scouts selling cookies to the audience, and live performances of the three nominated songs. Chris Rock did a stellar job as host, tackling the criticism about this year’s lack of diversity head on from his opening monologue, and crossing the line on several other occasions. Many of the presenters and winners took the opportunity to voice their concerns about diversity, equal opportunity, climate change and sexual assault awareness.

Mad Max: Fury Road led the way with six wins, cleaning up the technical categories including Best Editing and Best Production Design. I am sure everybody wondered if this would also be George Miller’s day too. The Revenant claimed three – including Best Director for Alejandro G. Inarritu in addition to Leonardo DiCaprio (Best Actor) and Emmanuel Lubezki (Best Cinematography), who were all-but sure things. Brie Larson claimed a win for Room (Best Actress), Mark Rylance landed Best Supporting Actor for Bridge of Spies and Alicia Vikander was deemed the Best Supporting Actress for The Danish Girl. The Big Short won Best Adapted Screenplay and Ennio Morricone won his very first Oscar, at age 87, for The Hateful Eight. As many predicted Inside Out, Amy and Son of Saul were honoured for Best Animated, Documentary and Foreign Language Films respectively.

But, it was Spotlight that won the first and last awards – Best Original Screenplay and Best Picture – coming through the preferential ballot on top to become one of only a handful of films to win Best Picture with only one other victory. The film’s tremendous ensemble, its important and topical subject, and the fact that it is almost universally admired contributed.

Some personal highlights from the ceremony and the complete list of winners can be found after the jump: Continue reading »

Jan 112016
 

the-revenant

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association have selected the winners for the 2016 Golden Globe Awards, presented today. I didn’t get the chance to catch any of the ceremony, again hosted by Ricky Gervais, and apart from snippets of tweets and the odd photographed celebrity (Kirsten Dunst was particularly eye-catching) the winners were the business at hand. The Revenant and The Martian took out Best Motion Picture – Drama and Musical or Comedy respectively, claiming five awards between them, with Steve Jobs joining them as the only other film to end the night looking greedy.

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu won his second straight Golden Globe (Best Director for The Revenant to follow up Best Screenplay for Birdman), while Leonardo DiCaprio and Brie Larson staked their claim as the Oscar favourites, winning for their widely-acclaimed performances. Sylvester Stallone was honoured for Best Supporting Actor for his career-best work in Creed, while another veteran, Ennio Morricone, was also celebrated for his original score contribution to The Hateful Eight. 

So, what do these victories mean for the Academy Award nominations? Nothing. The voting for those nominees has now closed. What it does do is shift the momentum for certain films and individuals. The crossover between the two is becoming less predictable, but this is shaping up to be one of the wildest, most unpredictable award seasons in recent years. It is expected that today’s winners will at least receive an Oscar nomination, but apart from perhaps DiCaprio, who looks the likely Best Actor winner, the Academy could go a whole different way.

The Revenant’s success was surprising. It is an extraordinary film, and thoroughly deserved to win, but considering the loud negative reaction we didn’t foresee a large body of voters agreeing on it. The Martian’s victory (and Damon’s for Best Actor-Comedy) in an ill-suited category is less significant, but the fact that it beat the film with the most momentum and the widely predicted winner in The Big Short, does make one re-evaluate The Martian’s chances. Jobs too has been quietly landing acting nominations for cast Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet, and Aaron Sorkin’s script, but both victories today (for Winslet and Sorkin) were unexpected. Tom McCarthy’s Spotlight is the film that lost a lot of momentum today. When it failed to win Best Screenplay, that film’s big trump card, we knew it was in trouble.

The winners in the film categories are after the jump. For the rest of the winners, visit the Golden Globes website: Continue reading »

Jun 172013
 


 
The trailer for Martin Scorse’s The Wolf of Wall Street has dropped, and it’s a strange beast. Starring Leonardo Dicaprio, Matthew McConaughey, Jonah Hill, Kyle Chandler and more, the film is based on Jordan Belfort’s best-selling memoir, about his rise, and subsequent fall as a stockbroker on Wall Street. Dicaprio stars as Belfort, who refused to cooperate in a large securities fraud case involving corruption on Wall Street, the corporate banking world and mob infiltration.
 
The film has a November 15 release date in the US. There is no Australian release date at present.
 
Please share your thoughts! Is anyone else getting some [unfortunate] Gatsby vibes from this trailer, or is it just me..?
 

By Sam McCosh

Jan 192013
 

django-unchained

Jamie Foxx plays a slave who is freed by an Austrian bounty hunter which eventuates in the two rescuing his wife from a despicable plantation owner. Oh and it’s directed by Quentin Tarantino so many many MANY people die in bloody and horrific ways. Did I also forget to mention Leonardo Dicaprio plays a villain, Christoph Waltz gives his best performance yet and Samuel L Jackson is funnier than ever? My review after the jump.

Continue reading »