Oct 202016
 

rs-247750-rs-cafe-society

Cafe Society, which premiered at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival and opened the festival, is the 47th feature film by Woody Allen. With a budget of $30 million, it is also his most expensive film to date. These days you typically know what you’re going to get from a Woody Allen film, and his distinctive opening credits are immediately a dead giveaway. But, he still seems to possess the capacity to surprise, and the visually splendid Cafe Society is one such example.

With Jesse Eisenberg again standing in as the Woody Allen surrogate (he’s actually done this before in the awful To Rome With Love), Woody turns his lens on 1930’s Hollywood, as a young New Yorker (Eisenberg), trying to make a career out West, finds his dreams dashed when he falls in love with Vonnie (Kristen Stewart), the assistant of his talent agent uncle, Phil (Steve Carrell).  Continue reading »

Mar 232016
 

batmanvsuperman

The hero of Metropolis vs the hero of Gotham. Are they really heroes or are they vigilantes who see themselves above any rule of law? In an epic showdown between two of the greatest superheroes, will there be any winners? Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is reviewed after the jump.

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Nov 102015
 

o-END-OF-THE-TOUR-facebook-800x400

The End of the Tour is directed by the very talented American filmmaker James Ponsoldt (Smashed, The Spectacular Now and the upcoming adaptation of Dave Eggers’ The Circle) and written by Pulitzer-winning playwright Donald Margulies from David Lipsky’s best-selling memoir ‘Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself’. It is a film that brilliantly takes a snapshot of the existential-anxieties of the mid 90’s while still remaining poignant and relevant to the present, documenting a myth-busting of a giant of contemporary literature, and a breakdown of the pedestaled trappings we often associate with celebrities and ‘geniuses’.

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Aug 262014
 

Night Moves

Opening in a remote Oregon national park, we meet Josh (Jesse Eisenberger) and Dena (Dakota Fanning) as they are walking around a damn. We soon discover the reason for their visit is recon for an upcoming act of crime which they intend to commit in the name of the environment, a big F U to big business. Along with Harmon (Peter Sarsgaard), the pair intend to stuff a motorboat (named ‘Night Moves’) full of a homemade fertilizer explosive and blow up the damn.

Very much a film of two halves, pre-crime and post-crime, we see the planning of the explosion and then how the threesome deals with the consequences of their action, which are far more serious than they could have envisioned. What Night Moves does so well, is let the character’s actions speak for themselves. There’s very little exposition here, with writer Jonathan Raymond and writer-director Kelly Reichardt trusting their audience enough to fill in the gaps. Truth be told we don’t need to know more, the real story is in how they exist after the events, not what drove them to it.

Jesse Eisenberg is quietly intense as Josh, his controlled performance serving to emphasise his characters few outbursts. Dakota Fanning is emotive but understated as Dena, and it is through her that the moral conundrum of their actions play out. What is the difference between eco-terrorism and eco-activism? Do the ends justify the means? Reichardt lets the audience decide this for themselves, although events in the final scenes (which may be too hard for many to buy) may be interpreted as a shove in a particular direction.
 

3.5/5
 

By Sam McCosh

 
The Facts

Director: Kelly Reichardt
Writer(s): Jonathan Raymond, Kelly Reichardt
Starring: Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning, Peter Sarsgaard
Runtime: 112 minutes
Release date(s): Australia & New Zealand: September 11 2014

May 062014
 

the double

Imagine that one day a person who looks exactly like you appears in your life. This person has a name similar to yours, but their personality is almost the exact opposite. Your friends and workmates don’t think there’s anything strange about this person, and they slowly move in your life. Wouldn’t you feel like you were in a horror film? That you were going mad? My review of The Double after the jump.

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