Jan 112016
 

the-revenant

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association have selected the winners for the 2016 Golden Globe Awards, presented today. I didn’t get the chance to catch any of the ceremony, again hosted by Ricky Gervais, and apart from snippets of tweets and the odd photographed celebrity (Kirsten Dunst was particularly eye-catching) the winners were the business at hand. The Revenant and The Martian took out Best Motion Picture – Drama and Musical or Comedy respectively, claiming five awards between them, with Steve Jobs joining them as the only other film to end the night looking greedy.

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu won his second straight Golden Globe (Best Director for The Revenant to follow up Best Screenplay for Birdman), while Leonardo DiCaprio and Brie Larson staked their claim as the Oscar favourites, winning for their widely-acclaimed performances. Sylvester Stallone was honoured for Best Supporting Actor for his career-best work in Creed, while another veteran, Ennio Morricone, was also celebrated for his original score contribution to The Hateful Eight. 

So, what do these victories mean for the Academy Award nominations? Nothing. The voting for those nominees has now closed. What it does do is shift the momentum for certain films and individuals. The crossover between the two is becoming less predictable, but this is shaping up to be one of the wildest, most unpredictable award seasons in recent years. It is expected that today’s winners will at least receive an Oscar nomination, but apart from perhaps DiCaprio, who looks the likely Best Actor winner, the Academy could go a whole different way.

The Revenant’s success was surprising. It is an extraordinary film, and thoroughly deserved to win, but considering the loud negative reaction we didn’t foresee a large body of voters agreeing on it. The Martian’s victory (and Damon’s for Best Actor-Comedy) in an ill-suited category is less significant, but the fact that it beat the film with the most momentum and the widely predicted winner in The Big Short, does make one re-evaluate The Martian’s chances. Jobs too has been quietly landing acting nominations for cast Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet, and Aaron Sorkin’s script, but both victories today (for Winslet and Sorkin) were unexpected. Tom McCarthy’s Spotlight is the film that lost a lot of momentum today. When it failed to win Best Screenplay, that film’s big trump card, we knew it was in trouble.

The winners in the film categories are after the jump. For the rest of the winners, visit the Golden Globes website: Continue reading »

Nov 202015
 

mockingjay2

Francis Lawrence returns to direct the final cinematic adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ best-selling novel series. From literary phenomenon to enormously popular blockbuster series, The Hunger Games have become a staple of the cinematic calendar, just as enduring heroine Katniss Everdeen and lead actress Jennifer Lawrence have become household names. Once a face in the crowd, Katniss has become a liberator of a revolution and a wielder of enormous responsibility. Her strong will, integrity and selflessness when faced with life-threatening stakes has made her a source of inspiration for many. A refresh of the events in Part 1 are not supplied here – the story continues immediately – so it is recommended that you familiarise yourself before delving into the finale. Unfortunately, the over-attenuated Mockingjay Part 2 will likely serve as a satisfying resolution for die-hard fans of the novels, but for those who have enjoyed the films and are eagerly seeking closure, it possesses the same issues that plagued Part 1.  Continue reading »

Nov 162014
 

MockingjayPart1

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 is the first cinematic half of the third and final installment in the Hunger Games franchise, based on the best-selling novels by Suzanne Collins. Francis Lawrence, who directed the excellent second film, Catching Fire, returns to direct, and the story continues to follow Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) as she becomes a reluctant hero and symbol of hope for Panem after escaping the Third Quarter Quell Hunger Games.

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May 262014
 

x-men

The war has come and Mutants are a species on the brink of extinction. They and their kin are hunted and taken out with absolutely no mercy. Some have outrun their hunters, but they are fast running out of places to hide. What if there was a way to stop this war happening before it even begun? X-Men: Days of Future Past is reviewed after the jump.

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Dec 132013
 

“You set a crook to catch a crook. We put the big honey pot out there and all the flies came to us”. This was said by Mel Weinberg in 1981. Christian Bale plays Irving Rosenfeld whom is entirely based on Mel, and the above statement is expanded and elaborated on as the plot of American Hustle. However, it’s the moment you see Irving taking more than five minutes to put a wig on that we realise very few crooks will be harmed in the telling of this story. My review after the jump.

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Nov 242013
 

The sequel to the surprisingly nuanced The Hunger Games, Catching Fire re-introduces us to the compelling Katniss Everdeen, one of the most intriguing literary/film heroines this side of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’s Lisbeth Salander. But as history has shown, it’s a slippery slope indeed when a sequel gets greenlit. My review of The Hunger Games: Catching Fire after the jump.

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