chris

Dec 242017
 

So, the following list contains my favourite films of the year. I normally run with 25 favourites but I saw 168 new films this year (62 alone were from film festivals) which is more than my usual so I’ve upped it to 30 (And even then it broke my heart cutting some out of a list that began with 50).

These films embodied an honesty and optimism that were needed in a year like this one. These films reflected social progression and change. These 30 films for me encompassed all of those feelings yet not a single one, no matter when or where it was set, ever ignores the current state of things and how bad they are. They each acknowledge it and then give you something in return.

These films are inclusive, exciting, progressive, challenging, hopeful and they greatly improved my year.

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 Posted by at 10:11
Dec 192016
 

 
There are so many unwritten rules about making a Best Of/favourites list. Some of these were released in some place in 2015, and some aren’t necessarily feature-length films. The films on this list were released in Australia in 2016 in some format, or played here at a festival. They are the 25 films that I learned something from in some way or another. They each in some way challenge either sexism, racism, and classism; and they reinforce the importance that stories have in allowing us to challenge injustices in our world.

If there’s any that don’t make sense, hit me up or ask away. I’d love to talk about any thoughts you have on any of the films listed after the jump.

As always, I hope you dig – Chris.
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Dec 232015
 

45 Years Still

This was a year of so many wonderfully inclusive, sweet, exciting, different, heartbreaking and magical films. And if you were to think for a second that statement is an exaggeration – I believe that the top six films on this list are better than any film I saw last year. It was the year of smart, fun, thoughtful and strong women as protagonists in films. It could always be better, there’s always room for improvement, but I hope that the films on this list in some way represent the amazing women in film this year and my feelings regarding that.

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Nov 172015
 

99homes

Chris Elena was lucky enough to speak with Ramin Bahrani back in June when he was a guest of the Sydney Film Festival, in town to promote his new film 99 Homes. The film is released in Australian cinemas Thursday 19 November and we highly recommend go out and see it. Some thoughts from Chris on the film and some words from Ramin Bahrani are after the jump – [Ed].

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Jun 032015
 

jpeedem

In my never-ending fight to see female directed films on the big screen, I did all I could to peruse the latest Sydney Film Festival program to see just how many films directed by women were being showcased over the 12 day festival, screening over 200 features, here’s a list of all the ones I could find and all the films I’ll be making my mission to see over the next 12 days.

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Dec 232014
 

immigrant

So, the rule, if any is..if it got any sort of release in 2014, it’s eligible. The rule of festivals means nothing, purely because I’m still waiting for a DVD release of Alps which was on my list in 2012. If you see a film on this list that you want to catch but it was a festival film, it should hopefully encourage you, like me to fight to see the film in some way!

These films, these are the ones with good female characters, characters of ethnic diversity, characters who speak languages other than English and stories that exclude no one, but to some degree baffle all.

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Apr 192014
 

Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston star are a married couple who just so happen to be vampires. They’re moody, they’re cool, they’re intelligent and philosophical, but they also happen to be hungry. Whilst contemplating scientists and theorists, they tend to also include their dinner within that mix and no, they do not sparkle or pout at thin air. My review of Only Lovers Left Alive after the jump.

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Mar 172014
 

A 10 year-old girl living in Saudi Arabia abides by her strict culture yet never stops observing and questions the more unfair notions of a society that operate in the favour of men. All she wants however, is a bike, but she’s told that it’s not appropriate for a young girl’s virtue. She just wants to be an individual with the freedom to experience pure joy, much like any child does. Does it resonate? Do we come to care about a girl and her bike in the first place? My review of Wadjda after the jump.

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